How to find your Linux version number
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How to find your Linux version number


What is an operating system version number?

A version number is a unique set of numbers representing the specific release of an operating system.

The Linux version number is the mainline kernel version and follows the format of major.minor.patch. The version number also depends on the distribution you’re using.


Ubuntu

Run the command $ cat /proc/version_signature to find the version number. In 5.15.0-47.51-generic 5.15.46, the last three numbers 5.15.46 is the mainline kernel version number.

If you want your team to use Ubuntu 5.15.46 or a later version, enter, for example, 5.15.46 in the Device Security Posture Monitor Operating system version field.

More information about Ubuntu kernels: Ubuntu kernels from Canonical.


Fedora

Run the command $ uname -r to find the version number. In 5.18.13-200.fc36.x86_64, the first three numbers 5.18.13 is the mainline kernel version number.

If you want your team to use Fedora 5.18.13 or a later version, enter, for example, 5.18.13 in the Device Security Posture Monitor Operating system version field.

More information about Fedora kernels: Fedora Linux Kernel Overview.


Debian

Run the command $ uname -a to find the version number.

In Linux myhost.mydomain 5.10.0-16-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 5.10.127-2 (2022-07-23) x86_64 GNU/Linux, the part Debian 5.10.127 is the mainline kernel version number.

If you want your team to use Debian 5.10.127 or a later version, enter, for example, 5.10.127 in the Device Security Posture Monitor Operating system version field.

More information about Debian kernels: Version numbers and ABIs.


OpenSUSE

Run the command $ uname -r to find the version number. In 5.19.2-1-default, the first three numbers 5.19.2 is the mainline kernel version number.

If you want your team to use OpenSUSE 5.19.0 or a later version, enter, for example, 5.19.0 in the Device Security Posture Monitor Operating system version field.

More information about OpenSUSE kernels: OpenSUSE Kernel Portal.


Other distributions

Please check your distribution-specific documentation to find information about the installed kernel version and its corresponding mainline version. Otherwise, running uname -r will usually provide the necessary version information.

More information on kernel releases: Active Kernel Releases.

Note: In case you have any questions or are experiencing any issues, please feel free to contact our 24/7 customer support team.


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